Kids

3-year-old dancers show off fancy footwork and the routine is loved by over 10M

July 20th, 2021

Is there anything cuter than toddlers with talent? These adorable cuties are amazing dancers – and they’re only 3-years-old!

The joropo is the national dance of Venezuela although you’ll find elements of its style throughout Europe, Africa, and the rest of the Americas as well.

Performed most often as a couples dance, the men traditionally wear a jacket and pants as well as a cowboy hat while the women are dressed in flowing, brightly colored dresses. The dance itself involves some fancy footwork while the couple holds each other closely and executes a series of rapid steps and some waltz-like turns as well.

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Wikimedia Commons Source: Wikimedia Commons

That’s precisely what we see in this mini version of the joropo that a user by the name of “Nodier Suarez Cordoba” posted to YouTube in 2017.

The video, presumably, is older than that since she says she is the little girl in the video. If the caption is correct, then this was her first time performing in front of an audience and her partner is her young cousin.

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Screenshot via Nodier Suarez Cordoba/YouTube Source: Screenshot via Nodier Suarez Cordoba/YouTube

The video has racked up over 4 MILLION views in less than 2 years because of the promise these tiny dancers show. They’re disciplined, talented, serious, and totally in sync.

The two begin by greeting the judges as the music begins. A few steps are followed by the first twirl, which is already well beyond the skills of most people watching. The pair then moves around in a circular formation and their tiny feet manage to keep up with the music with ease.

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Screenshot via Nodier Suarez Cordoba/YouTube Source: Screenshot via Nodier Suarez Cordoba/YouTube

The waltz-like steps are evident as the performance continues and the serious looks on the tykes’ faces indicate that they’re working hard to count carefully.

Then comes the real action as the boy and girl face each other with hands clasped and execute a series of tiny, sprightly kicks forward that just keep getting faster. The crowd roars as the camera pans in on their little feet kicking away.

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Screenshot via Nodier Suarez Cordoba/YouTube Source: Screenshot via Nodier Suarez Cordoba/YouTube

We’re tired just watching that part!

But three-year-olds have a lot more energy than we do, so the show goes on. Now it appears everything is sped up – the music, the steps, the twirls. It’s actually hard to believe these kids can pull off such a routine.

More smooth moves follow as both kids and adults watch on from the sidelines in awe. Next comes some smooth footwork from the female dancer and stomping of the male dancer’s feet – that is an integral part of the joropo.

They’re both executing largely the same movements but with a different level of vigor.

And despite being just 3 years old, this pair can also execute the dance move called the “bow-tie” in which they swing under intertwined arms – and they do it while spinning!

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Screenshot via Nodier Suarez Cordoba/YouTube Source: Screenshot via Nodier Suarez Cordoba/YouTube

When we get back to more footwork it becomes clear that our dancers are even managing to maintain eye contact throughout their performance, reading both each other’s movements and intentions as well as the music.

As they finish up, the announcer riles up the crowd once more and cheers and screaming ring out for the impressive pair. But, alas, they’re not done – there’s still more fast-kicking to do!

NOW we’re done as our gentleman takes a short bow and twirls the lady around to signal that the three dizzying minutes of Venezuelan dance are up. The kids head off to the waiting arms of a loved one after one heck of an impressive show!

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Screenshot via Nodier Suarez Cordoba/YouTube Source: Screenshot via Nodier Suarez Cordoba/YouTube

Watch these little cuties dance in the video below.

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

Source: Dance Ask, Nodier Suarez Cordoba via YouTube

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