Talent

Musical duo plays perfect cover of ‘Sugar Plum Fairy’ on “glass harp”

June 23rd, 2020

We all have plenty of things that we use every day.

However, we’re often unaware that those same objects could be used as something else—like an instrument. A lot of creative people around the world use these objects and turn them into beautiful ways to create music.

As many people know, you can even make a wine glass sing a tune!

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

Let’s do a quick experiment first.

Pour half a glass of water on your wine glass. Next, dip your finger in water and then try rubbing the moistened finger along the rim of the glass. If you can hear a singing tune, you are doing it right. The reason that happens according to Scientific American is that “the sides of the glass transmit the vibration to the surrounding air, creating a sound wave with a specific frequency.”

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

The frequency differs that resonates from the glass is typically audible to us and since the frequency differs depending on the glass and the water within it, the tone it gives also differs.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

Let’s meet these cool musicians who use glasses as their instrument.

A couple from Poland, Anna and Arkadiusz Szafraniec, were once performers in the symphony orchestra in Gdansk. Still, it wasn’t long until they ditched their places to pursue something else. The couple was interested in the concept of singing or musical glasses, which is why they opened themselves to the idea of performing with them.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

Glass harpist groups are relatively rare all over the world.

Still, the duo had the confidence to show their skills to the world. They called themselves the GlassDuo and since then, they have been invited to a lot of local and international music festivals, as well as getting the chance to be recorded for radio and television. In the group’s bio, they claimed that they are the only glass music group in Poland.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

The GlassDuo managed to recreate Tchaikovsky’s “Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy” live.

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Facebook/GlassDuo - Glass Harp Source: Facebook/GlassDuo - Glass Harp

As you can see in the video, the duo set up their five-octave glass harp on their stage.

Unlike the conventional wine glass, the professional glass harp does not need water into their endless set of glasses for them to work, and they are pretty much tuned already. Before the performance, Arkadiusz told the audience that they are recording, not using a playback. Finally, the duo started playing “Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy,” one of the songs from the second act of Tchaikovsky’s The Nutcracker Suite.

You would be surprised how their gentle touch brought out such angelic sounds!

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

The moment they tapped and rubbed their fingers on the glasses, the smooth, crystal tune naturally echoed from across the room.

The tune was so mesmerizing that you couldn’t help but lost in the heavenly music. Arkadiusz and Anna harmonized their singing glasses with each other, and every note they played was perfectly accurate that you cannot distinguish which is which compared to the original. The beautiful rendition is available on their album GLASSIFIED.

You don’t need a whole orchestra to nail classical music—GlassDuo can pretty much do it themselves!

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

GlassDuo brought their glass music to many famous concert halls, nailing every classical music to perfection.

The duo continues to enrich the world with their unique sound and professionalism in their crafts all the while battling their stereotypes.

If you want to listen to more of their artistic works, visit them on YouTube and watch the video below:

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

Sources: Scientific American, Glass Duo, YouTube/GlassDuo-Glass Harp

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