Impromptu
Little boy plays fun piano medley of popular dance hits and gathers a huge crowd of listeners
This little boy's incredible piano skills have garnered over 19 million views - and it's easy to see why.
Patricia Lynn
04.07.23

The piano is one of the most infinitely complicated instruments, with a maximum number of 88 keys split into seven octaves.

Its complexity does not end with just its number of keys, however, as there are also many things to remember while playing the piano.

flickr.com - joyof
Source:
flickr.com - joyof

With this single instrument, you must apply melody, harmony, and rhythm at once.

You must identify the correct octaves together, all while memorizing scales and finger patterns.

Learning piano usually takes weeks, months, and probably years to master it.

Even so, this 12-year-old pianist who plays the keys at a public piano in Liverpool seems to have it down!

YouTube Screenshot - Harrison Piano
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Harrison Piano

A young pianist sat in front of a red piano placed on the side of the street.

As he readies himself to play, we’re guessing nobody on the street was paying much attention.

Before long, he gently strokes his fingers on the keys, and the people passing are stunned to hear a melodious piece coming from the tiny fingers of this young man, Harrison Crane.

YouTube Screenshot - Harrison Piano
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Harrison Piano

Crane decides to play a series of 1990s dance music pieces starting with Robert Miles’ “Children.”

When the passing shoppers hear the familiar tune, they stop and watch the kid as he plays.

After a little portion of the song, he finds a way to make a clean transition to “Blue (Da Ba Dee)” by Eiffel 65, then follows that shortly after with DJ Darude’s “Sandstorm.”

At that point, the crowd was already huge enough to surround him on that narrow street!

Many people stayed to listen and to make their stay worthwhile; some took their phones out and recorded Crane’s performance.

YouTube Screenshot - Harrison Piano
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Harrison Piano

The crowd sways to the beat and starts tapping their feet as the young pianist plays “Seven Nation Army” by The White Stripes.

Once again, he loops back to the song “Children” in his finale.

Needless to say, this kid makes playing the piano look like a piece of cake.

YouTube Screenshot - Harrison Piano
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Harrison Piano

Throughout the performance, Crane shows grace and skill on the street piano.

Despite his little fingers, he could hit all the notes accurately.

With an almost flawless and effortless performance, he made it seem easy to play the piano.

Still, it’s also commendable that he could perform spectacularly well in front of such a large audience.

YouTube Screenshot - Harrison Piano
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Harrison Piano

For a 12-year-old boy, he was already at a level higher than your average pianist!

Who knows how large the next crowd he performs for will be if he preserves his passion and continues playing?

Even the netizens were dumbfounded by his talent.

YouTube Screenshot - Harrison Piano
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - Harrison Piano

After displaying his talent on that street in Liverpool, he was drowned with cheers and applause.

He also received kind words and compliments from his audience on the internet, as Crane uploaded this clip on YouTube on his channel Harrison Piano. He racked up an impressive 4.7 million views and 83,000 likes.

As it turns out, this was not the first time Crane performed piano in front of a crowd.

Pexels - Pixabay
Source:
Pexels - Pixabay

On his YouTube channel, he posts videos of his piano covers and some of his stage and street performances.

Undoubtedly, this kid could go places with his talent and passion as a pianist!

Check out the full performance by clicking the link below!

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

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By Patricia Lynn
[email protected]
Patricia Lynn is a senior writer at Shareably. Patricia is based out of San Francisco and can be reached at [email protected]
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