Dance

Creative dance video shows couples dances from 1911 to now

September 16th, 2020

There are plenty of times when we notice certain details about a dance routine and say, “Look! This dance would probably go well with this song.”

As it turns out, that’s the same effect we’re getting from this song!

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

Indeed, some dance routines work well with music that’s different than the music it was meant to go with.

There are even dance tutors who offer to teach amateurs simple dance routines that could work anywhere, especially if they’re trying not to embarrass themselves on the club’s dancefloor.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

For the video today, the original dance routine has actually been separated from the original music—but the results are still pretty awesome.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

The title of the video is 100 years of fashion in 100 seconds.

The title alone gives you the whole gist of what the video was going to be: showing you a century-long timeline of the different fashion styles, all using dancing as a medium for it.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

It was Westfield Stratford City Shopping Centre London’s idea to promote this informative video on the internet.

In every second of the clip, the dancers wear different and colorful outfits that correspond to the year those outfits were originally popular.

As this clip shows, someone found the perfect song for TheSmileVEVO’s video.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

YouTube user CalifOlivia may have happened to pass this video while browsing YouTube and found out that a song from Parov Stelar fit the dance routines in the video better.

The song was called “Booty Swing,” a Parov Stelar song from 2010. As this clip shows, it’s definitely a perfect fit! Parov Stelar is an Austrian musician that combines elements of jazz, house, electro, hip-hop and pop into his songs. Because of the song’s mixed musical elements, it was able to capture both traditional and contemporary features that were shown on the video.

The video started with the dancers trying to give off an impression of 1911’s clothing and culture.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

They first danced a generic ballroom dance before suddenly transitioning into a tango.

You could also find them doing traditional swing dancing before transitioning into some iconic dance moves like the ’60s move “The Swim.”

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

They then reached into the ’80s to ’90s era where you could see the dancers doing some Saturday Night Fever-style moves to the early hip hop culture.

Moreover, the dancers transitioned to voguing, modern hip hop dancing and finally contemporary dances. The dancers did a great job making an impression on several dance cultures while promoting their clothing line at the same time. This is definitely a creative performance—but the construction of the video is a little bit controversial.

The original video only had several thousand views compared to the re-uploaded one.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

The re-uploaded video racked up 3.1 million views on YouTube leaving the original video with only a few thousand views.

It was amazing how CalifOlivia was able to find the perfect music for the original video, although some people felt a little guilty after her re-uploaded video racked up so much recognition. Even so, the talent of the dancers shines through in both versions—so we’ll leave it up to the viewers to decide which one they prefer! In any event, we’ll be watching this video again and again.

Be sure to check out the entire performance by clicking on the link below:

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

Sources: YouTube/califOlivia, YouTube/TheSmileVEVO, Wikipedia

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